In this fractured world, the Bogue Falaya River becomes a highway paved with benedictions, psalms, and praise for ordinary things, as Pelegrin searches the unfamiliar for an incarnation of home. The new translation, by Geoffrey Brock, corrects old inaccuracies and burnishes the shining prose with which Calvino delivered his literary legacy. Drawn from the rich folk traditions of his native Mammoth Cave region in Kentucky as well as the folklore of his adopted Ozark Mountains of Arkansas, the poems in Davis McCombs's third collection exist along the fraught lines where nature and agriculture collide or in those charged moments where modernity intrudes on an archaic world.

These poems celebrate out-of-the-way places, the lore of plants, wild animals and their unknowable lives, and nearly forgotten ways of being and talking and doing. Rendered in a language of great lexical juxtapositions, here are days of soil and labor, nights lit only by firelight, and the beings, possibly not of this world, lured like moths to its flames.

McCombs, always a poet of place and of rootedness, writes poems teetering between two locales, one familiar but achingly distant, one bewildering but alluringly present. Other essays focus on surgery, money, childhood memories, changing perspectives, and the vagaries of the age.

Gilchrist pays special attention to her evolving relationships with her adult children and the pleasures and pitfalls of being a grandmother and great-grandmother. The volume also includes essays from her diary about the sense of place in her mountain home near her work at the University of Arkansas and about life after Hurricane Katrina on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, her second residence.

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Wylie has witnessed a woman falling to her death outside the Luxor Hotel. Troubled by the ensuing cover-up, he becomes a man on a mission, enlisting the help of his old friend, an ace card player and master magician, to help find answers. The intimate lies down alongside the epic, the jocular shares the verdant field with the chthonic.

This auspicious first collection possesses originality and depth, attributes far rarer than talent and skill. And the spells break, as they must, mid-lyric, again and again, for wounds, for losses and betrayals and exiles so willingly heard out that distance becomes a welcome medium.

Frank Stanford summoned not from literary consensus but from a living consciousness. The dead and the alive, not drowning.

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And forgiveness as boundary crosser unto perpetuity. There is searing consolation here, the sort that returns trust to poetry. Meanwhile, a new beginning is captured in raw, smoldering, and cathartic expression, leaving an aftermath of aria despite discordant events. Perfectly distilled into moments of sharp humor and poignancy, her latest collection features ordinary people in sometimes extraordinary circumstances. The birds that fill these pages convey a sense of fragility and uncertainty, while the rhythm of the seasons provides a comfort that promises the old will be made new again.

In a precise yet accessible style, Bray writes about fleeting actions and thoughts that, in sum, create the memorable, lasting moments of life. Here in the mountains, he gets drawn by his grandfather into a maze of half-truths. And here, he falls in love with an unobtainable Muslim girl. Old ghosts come back to life and forgotten conflicts blaze anew until the past surrenders its shameful secrets. And then, what to do with your specimens, including how to build a cabinet of curiosities out of common household objects, like a desk organizer or a box for fishing tackle.

Resurrecting the place and its people alongside their heartaches and triumphs, Margaret McMullan creates a riveting mosaic that feeds our wish to understand what it means to be alive in this day and age. But before Lutz Bassmann, the last post-exoticist writer, passes away, journalists will try and pry out all the secrets of this powerful literary movement. Translated from the French by J. Many of the stories contain contemporary versions of ancient guides: a ghost dog seen by a young drifter in love with a much older guru; a wild goat on a cliff forever standing beside her dead ram glimpsed by a woman whose husband battles cancer; a volcano goddess with a small dog appearing to a woman whose boyfriend is flirting with her teenage daughter.

What is it about the relationship between fathers and daughters that provokes so much exquisite tenderness, satisfying communion, longing for more, idealization from both ends, followed often if not inevitably by disappointment, hurt, and the need to understand and forgive, or to finger the guilt of not understanding and loving enough?

The editor, Margaret McMullan, is herself a distinguished novelist and educator. How wonderfully Sandy Longhorn surprises her reader. These are poems about the simple truth of needing to make ends meet. Voices Bright Flags is a series of experiments in what is sometimes called public poetry, where the author's relationship with his country provides the main theme.

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BFA in Creative and Professional Writing | Maharishi University

The poems approach America from a range of perspectives - political, historical, and personal - and in a range of styles and voices, with each voice planting its own flag, as it were, implying its own America. Together the poems form a partial mosaic, a discordant chorus, a succession of conversations and quarrels between the author and the motley citizens of his imagination.

In , almost 20 years after the fatal bombing of an Air India flight from Vancouver, 2 suspects--finally--are on trial for the crime. Ashwin Rao, an Indian psychologist trained in Canada, comes back to do a "study of comparative grief," interviewing people who lost loved one in the attack.

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What he neglects to mention is that he, too, had family members who died on the plane. Then, to his delight and fear, he becomes embroiled in the lives of one family caught in the undertow of the tragedy, and privy to their secrets. Winner of the National Translation Award in Prose. It is a sultry August at the very end of the twentieth century, and Tristano is dying. When Bad Things Happen to Rich People is a novel of social satire, a black comedy set in Chicago in the summer of He had become a literary punch line when his novel, touted as the next big literary phenomenon, was universally panned by critics.

He and his pregnant wife, Flora, are struggling financially; however, their fortunes change when Nix is asked to ghostwrite the memoirs of publishing magnate Zira Fontaine. Dispensations pitches teens and adults with drug and alcohol problems against aging and ill-prepared parents. Thomas's characters test the boundaries of family responsibility.

Blind to each other's needs and feelings, they are haunted by visions of what their lives might have been and might still be. This debut collection by Geffrey Davis burrows under the surface of gender, addiction, recovery, clumsy love, bitterness, and faith. The tones explored—tender, comic, wry, tragic—interrogate male subjectivity and privilege, as they examine their "embarrassed desires" for familial connection, sexual love, compassion, and repair. Theirs are American Indian lives off the reservation, lives lived beyond the usual boundaries set for American Indian characters: migratory, often overlooked, yet carrying tradition with them into a future of difference and possibility.

Chloe Honum's brilliant first book The Tulip-Flame traces an identity forming within radically divergent but interlocking systems: a family traumatized by the mother's suicide, a failed relationship, the practice of ballet, a garden— each strict, exacting. And with "a crow's sky-knowing mind," Honum in every case transfigures emotion by way of elegant language and formal restraint. Chloe Honum is "one astounding flame" of a poet, and I predict a long-lasting one. Master short story writer Ellen Gilchrist, winner of the National Book Award, returns with her first story collection in over eight years.

In "Acts of God," she has crafted ten different scenarios in which people dealing with forces beyond their control somehow manage to survive, persevere, and triumph, even if it is only a triumph of the will.

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Ash Bowen's debut poetry collection carries its readers from the bedroom to the heavens in order to define what it means to be alive at this moment. The world seen in The Even Years of Marriage teems with promise while echoing strains of loss, with a constant awareness of personal mythology and universal longing. A failed wunderkind steals a golden cross from an Orthodox church.

The program has undergraduate students enrolled in just its second year. The major is one of the most diverse, with 23 percent coming from minority backgrounds, according to an IowaNow article. The English major focuses on discussing the history of English literature and different literary movements that occurred. Students in the major might aspire careers such as professors or English teachers. However, this major also features a range of courses that teach students creative writing across the genres of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry.

Iowa City is a place in which one could learn writing in the classroom and then enjoy a literary culture that the city has to offer, Fox said. So, the first students came from the English major. UI junior Austin Hughes was admitted to the department as an English major. Hughes came to UI with the ambition to write. When the major announced, he wanted to broaden his horizons by trying something new. One appeal of the major is that students get to pool classes from different areas of studies such as fiction, nonfiction, and poetry.

The program is also home to The Iowa Review. Its best-known faculty member currently is Nicholas Delbanco, a prolific novelist and essayist, as well as editor of works by the famous novelists Bernard Malamud and John Gardner. The Program is also the sponsor of the Zell Visiting Writers series, which brings distinguished visitors to the campus from around the country and the world. The campus is home to The Michigan Quarterly Review.